Quentin Felder Is Turning Photography Into Therapy
The Brooklyn-based photographer on his creative path, dream clientele, and his latest project, Familiar Faces.

 

 

Quentin Felder’s art is instantly recognizable. His work is a moment frozen in time; colorful, ethereal, and full of emotion. The Brooklyn-based photographer’s approach is 360, holistic, and healing. As someone who knows whole-heartedly how anxiety-driven this industry is, he makes sure his muses know they are more than just a photo.  But he doesn’t just work with those in front of the lens, he explores what goes on behind the scenes as well. 

His passion project, Familiar Faces, delves into the driving force of his counterparts in the creative world. It allows them to become the interviewees and the star of the show. For Quentin, Familiar Faces is akin to a therapy session, focusing on highlighting the lives of creative professionals in his field, while bringing awareness to their process. 

Miilkiina sat down with Quentin and spoke about his ambitions, advice to those who want to follow his path, and where he wants to take his projects in the future. Keep reading for more. 

Why are you passionate about photography? When did you first become interested in the art form? 

I’m passionate about photography because I’m obsessed with making individuals more confident in themselves. It’s always nice to see another person feel good about themselves. I first became interested in photography during my sophomore year of high school when I was given a project that needed photo work.

Tell us more about your project, Familiar Faces. 

Familiar Faces started off as a passion project that was put in place to combat my social anxiety. My goal was to allow myself to breakdown the barriers that I thought were holding me back from successfully moving forward in life. In the midst of helping myself, I thought “How could I help others throughout my process”? My goal is to work with different creative individuals to share a little bit of their backstory as well as their thought process. Instead of highlighting so many of the cool things that they’re done, I’m highlighting the things that show the viewers they’re still human and that they have real struggles. This process takes away the feeling of envy and the pressures of social media. All in all, I want to bring awareness to your process.

So Familiar Faces is about showcasing the artist behind the lens and bringing awareness to their process. Why don’t you tell us about your own process? 

My process consists of facing diversity, fearing interactions, and building confidence. Photography is therapy just as much as it is my passion. I know I’m not the only one that has felt this, so it’s good to express it to raise awareness for people who don’t speak on it to not feel alone.

What does it take to become a part of Familiar Faces? 

I select individuals that stick out to me and/or I personally know who provide genuine impact in their field of work.

Tell us about your move to New York. What about this city made you want to leave your hometown? 

I was originally born in Jacksonville, Florida but wasn’t there long enough to truly claim it my hometown. Home for me is Virginia Beach. I left home because I was ready and prepared to take a risk. I wanted more for myself; mentally, physically, and professionally. I hit a glass ceiling but I recognized I had talent and decided to take action. 

Being a freelancer is tough work. Between finances to finding jobs, it’s hard to keep a good balance. What’s your advice for your fellow entrepreneurs out there? 

Being a freelancer is indeed tough work. Some advice I would provide is to be genuine throughout all of your endeavors. Most of my work has come from relationships I’ve built with those around me. So thankful for the amazing people around me (you guys know who you are). Secondly don’t be afraid to get a second and/or third job. Lastly don’t get caught up in social media so much that you don’t even have your own website. Utilize everything around you, make prints, books, and t-shirts. DO NOT LIMIT YOURSELF.

So where do you draw inspiration from? 

My inspiration comes from everything around me. Some days it may be something my girlfriend said to me, other days it could’ve been an article of clothing I saw on someone walking in Brooklyn. I try not to limit my self to anything specific but one thing I would say is that traveling brightens my eyes. There are so many beautiful things in this world.

Definitely. What’s the key to taking a good photo?

The key to a good photo is including patterns, textures, and understanding the lighting around you. A little cliche, but the basics are what got me here. Additionally, I’d like to add that providing substance behind your work will transform it.

Classic, not cliche. What are your three favorite images ever captured? 

My favorite three images … Well, there are a few! Pharrell at Something In the Water. There’s a black and white portrait I took of my friend Lisa Park that I’m also obsessed with, I actually have it on my wall. Lastly, there’s an image I took on my phone from a plane window, while the sun was rising, and it was also raining.

These look sick. What about them makes them special to you?  

Those images either make me really feel something or allow me to reminisce about a special moment.

Who are some of your muses? 

Current muses are Danielle Leguillou and Kalysse Anthony because everything is always effortless and fun when It comes to getting the job done. I’d also include every individual apart of my Familiar Faces series because I am able to gain a unique connection each time.

And who are some of your dream clients? 

My dream clients are National Geographic and Nike!

Do you have any words of advice for aspiring photographers? 

Some advice I could provide is to keep learning, don’t solely lean on social media, and to build genuine relationships. 

And lastly, what’s one thing you want people to know about you?

If it’s not genuine, I don’t want it.

Quentin Felder Is Turning Photography Into Therapy
The Brooklyn-based photographer on his creative path, dream clientele, and his latest project, Familiar Faces.

 

 

Quentin Felder’s art is instantly recognizable. His work is a moment frozen in time; colorful, ethereal, and full of emotion. The Brooklyn-based photographer’s approach is 360, holistic, and healing. As someone who knows whole-heartedly how anxiety-driven this industry is, he makes sure his muses know they are more than just a photo.  But he doesn’t just work with those in front of the lens, he explores what goes on behind the scenes as well. 

His passion project, Familiar Faces, delves into the driving force of his counterparts in the creative world. It allows them to become the interviewees and the star of the show. For Quentin, Familiar Faces is akin to a therapy session, focusing on highlighting the lives of creative professionals in his field, while bringing awareness to their process. 

Miilkiina sat down with Quentin and spoke about his ambitions, advice to those who want to follow his path, and where he wants to take his projects in the future. Keep reading for more. 

Why are you passionate about photography? When did you first become interested in the art form? 

I’m passionate about photography because I’m obsessed with making individuals more confident in themselves. It’s always nice to see another person feel good about themselves. I first became interested in photography during my sophomore year of high school when I was given a project that needed photo work.

Tell us more about your project, Familiar Faces. 

Familiar Faces started off as a passion project that was put in place to combat my social anxiety. My goal was to allow myself to breakdown the barriers that I thought were holding me back from successfully moving forward in life. In the midst of helping myself, I thought “How could I help others throughout my process”? My goal is to work with different creative individuals to share a little bit of their backstory as well as their thought process. Instead of highlighting so many of the cool things that they’re done, I’m highlighting the things that show the viewers they’re still human and that they have real struggles. This process takes away the feeling of envy and the pressures of social media. All in all, I want to bring awareness to your process.

So Familiar Faces is about showcasing the artist behind the lens and bringing awareness to their process. Why don’t you tell us about your own process? 

My process consists of facing diversity, fearing interactions, and building confidence. Photography is therapy just as much as it is my passion. I know I’m not the only one that has felt this, so it’s good to express it to raise awareness for people who don’t speak on it to not feel alone.

What does it take to become a part of Familiar Faces? 

I select individuals that stick out to me and/or I personally know who provide genuine impact in their field of work.

Tell us about your move to New York. What about this city made you want to leave your hometown? 

I was originally born in Jacksonville, Florida but wasn’t there long enough to truly claim it my hometown. Home for me is Virginia Beach. I left home because I was ready and prepared to take a risk. I wanted more for myself; mentally, physically, and professionally. I hit a glass ceiling but I recognized I had talent and decided to take action. 

Being a freelancer is tough work. Between finances to finding jobs, it’s hard to keep a good balance. What’s your advice for your fellow entrepreneurs out there? 

Being a freelancer is indeed tough work. Some advice I would provide is to be genuine throughout all of your endeavors. Most of my work has come from relationships I’ve built with those around me. So thankful for the amazing people around me (you guys know who you are). Secondly don’t be afraid to get a second and/or third job. Lastly don’t get caught up in social media so much that you don’t even have your own website. Utilize everything around you, make prints, books, and t-shirts. DO NOT LIMIT YOURSELF.

So where do you draw inspiration from? 

My inspiration comes from everything around me. Some days it may be something my girlfriend said to me, other days it could’ve been an article of clothing I saw on someone walking in Brooklyn. I try not to limit my self to anything specific but one thing I would say is that traveling brightens my eyes. There are so many beautiful things in this world.

Definitely. What’s the key to taking a good photo?

The key to a good photo is including patterns, textures, and understanding the lighting around you. A little cliche, but the basics are what got me here. Additionally, I’d like to add that providing substance behind your work will transform it.

Classic, not cliche. What are your three favorite images ever captured? 

My favorite three images … Well, there are a few! Pharrell at Something In the Water. There’s a black and white portrait I took of my friend Lisa Park that I’m also obsessed with, I actually have it on my wall. Lastly, there’s an image I took on my phone from a plane window, while the sun was rising, and it was also raining.

These look sick. What about them makes them special to you?  

Those images either make me really feel something or allow me to reminisce about a special moment.

Who are some of your muses? 

Current muses are Danielle Leguillou and Kalysse Anthony because everything is always effortless and fun when It comes to getting the job done. I’d also include every individual apart of my Familiar Faces series because I am able to gain a unique connection each time.

And who are some of your dream clients? 

My dream clients are National Geographic and Nike!

Do you have any words of advice for aspiring photographers? 

Some advice I could provide is to keep learning, don’t solely lean on social media, and to build genuine relationships. 

And lastly, what’s one thing you want people to know about you?

If it’s not genuine, I don’t want it.

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