An Ode To Zaha Hadid
Paying homage to and exploring the work and life of the visionary architect.
zaha hadid miilkiina

Though a few years have passed since the departure of one of architecture’s most significant figures — the relevancy of Zaha Hadid persists. The Iraqi-British designer, educated in Beirut, was revered as the “Queen of the Curve.” She had designs commissioned around the world and was awarded the Royal Institute of British Architects’ gold medal in 2016. Hadid initially worked with Rem Koolhaas before beginning her own practice in 1979, where she developed her career as a leader in conceptual, neo-futuristic building design.

 

Hadid’s winning proposal for the private health club in the hills of Kowloon was a Cubist assemblage of cantilevered beams glistening from an excavated cliffside. Though it was never constructed, this work established her as a promising young voice and exposed a creative process, described by Kar-Hwa Ho, head of Interior Architecture at Zaha Hadid Architects (ZHA), as a “reflexive connection between the mind and the hand.”

zaha hadid miilkiina

As a fierce advocate for women in the creative fields, her work further extended far beyond buildings. In 2004, she became the first woman to win the Pritzker Architecture Prize, and in 2012 she was named a Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire for her accomplishments in the field of architecture. She once reflected, when addressing winning of the Veuve Clicquot businesswoman of the year in 2013: “Women are always told, ‘You’re not going to make it, it’s too difficult, you can’t do that, don’t enter this competition, you’ll never win it,’ – they need confidence in themselves and people around them to help them to get on.”

 

Above all, she transformed architecture with a vision of her own. Hadid collaborated with fashion brands — notably Louis Vuitton and Chanel — and created designs for the Serpentine Gallery and Georg Jensen. Her collaboration with Bulgari, namely the B.zero1 ring, was particularly eloquent. As a testament to the endurance of her trademark fluid and organic shapes, her mastery lay in her visions, adopting a variety of mediums: ceramics, gold, and precious stones amongst them. Hadid created in a manner that would not only surpass all limitations imposed upon her but one that would entirely transcend the borders of geography and the mind.

 

 

An Ode To Zaha Hadid
Paying homage to and exploring the work and life of the visionary architect.
zaha hadid miilkiina

Though a few years have passed since the departure of one of architecture’s most significant figures — the relevancy of Zaha Hadid persists. The Iraqi-British designer, educated in Beirut, was revered as the “Queen of the Curve.” She had designs commissioned around the world and was awarded the Royal Institute of British Architects’ gold medal in 2016. Hadid initially worked with Rem Koolhaas before beginning her own practice in 1979, where she developed her career as a leader in conceptual, neo-futuristic building design.

 

Hadid’s winning proposal for the private health club in the hills of Kowloon was a Cubist assemblage of cantilevered beams glistening from an excavated cliffside. Though it was never constructed, this work established her as a promising young voice and exposed a creative process, described by Kar-Hwa Ho, head of Interior Architecture at Zaha Hadid Architects (ZHA), as a “reflexive connection between the mind and the hand.”

zaha hadid miilkiina

As a fierce advocate for women in the creative fields, her work further extended far beyond buildings. In 2004, she became the first woman to win the Pritzker Architecture Prize, and in 2012 she was named a Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire for her accomplishments in the field of architecture. She once reflected, when addressing winning of the Veuve Clicquot businesswoman of the year in 2013: “Women are always told, ‘You’re not going to make it, it’s too difficult, you can’t do that, don’t enter this competition, you’ll never win it,’ – they need confidence in themselves and people around them to help them to get on.”

 

Above all, she transformed architecture with a vision of her own. Hadid collaborated with fashion brands — notably Louis Vuitton and Chanel — and created designs for the Serpentine Gallery and Georg Jensen. Her collaboration with Bulgari, namely the B.zero1 ring, was particularly eloquent. As a testament to the endurance of her trademark fluid and organic shapes, her mastery lay in her visions, adopting a variety of mediums: ceramics, gold, and precious stones amongst them. Hadid created in a manner that would not only surpass all limitations imposed upon her but one that would entirely transcend the borders of geography and the mind.

 

 

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